Contact Us

Use the form on the bottom right to contact us (including academic & media enquiries) or email anseo.info@gmail.com

For those seeking information regarding the data in the records, documented within our archives, you must first register as a member. Please note that there are strict data protection regulations in place regarding access to these records (please read our Data Protection and GDPR policies). For these and ALL genealogical enquiries please use this form (Click the Link) 

We will be shortly opening membership for the ANSEO! Project. Members include volunteers, supporters, sponsors and those wishing to learn more of the records we hold. We appreciate the support both, financial and in volunteering, to help us in our work. Please use the form above if you wish to keep updated on this & other news.

You may also write to: The Manager, The ANSEO! Project,

Moygownagh Community Centre, Moygownagh,

Co. Mayo, Ireland, F26 XRR9.

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Founded by historian & actor Liam Alex Heffron, the ANSEO! project digitally archives our statutory national school records, by gathering the images of each page, of each record book, taken by our enthusiastic volunteers. The result is a unique archive of digital records from primary schools and their communities, holding a wealth of interest for genealogists, academics, historians and any of us who went to school in one of these schools.

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Main Statutory Records

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Notice at the back of each statutory record book.

Notice at the back of each statutory record book.

Main Records

Each national school was required to keep statutory records, in the form of up to date information on each pupil in particular and the school administration in general. This was written up by the teacher in charge (usually the principal), in the school Registers, Roll Book(s) and Day Report Book(s). All were expected to be accurately stored and maintained, while being kept on site in each school, subject to inspection by the district inspector, with reprimand for any lapse.

To date, the ANSEO! pilot project has photographed over 280,000 images, of the records as they have survived for each participating school. No single school possesses all their records, with many schools only holding a selection of their main statutory books.

School Registers

These are the principal index records of boys and girls (almost always in separate register books) who attended each school.  They contain the following information for every pupil: School name & Parish, Pupil name, Year of birth, Year of registration, Age, Religious denomination, Home address, and Occupation of parent or guardian.

The records can also contain further information:

·       Name of previous school (if any), Number of days attendance, Classes enrolled into, with comments on performance of pupil. 

·       Results of examinations in various subjects including reading, writing, arithmetic, spelling, grammar, needlework and drawing.

·       Date pupil left the school and was readmitted (if applicable).

Day Report Books

This is the daily numerical tally of the school attendance, broken down into classes and gender.  This tally corresponds to the daily roll. The pupil attendance roll was taken at set times in the morning and failure to adequately record the correct details, was taken as a serious breach of school regulations by the Department inspector.

Roll Books

These are the daily-recorded attendances of each pupil, corresponding to their entry in the main school register. As each pupil’s name was read out by the teacher, in the obligatory morning roll-call, the pupil’s reply of “ANSEO!” (this is the Irish translation of  “HERE!” used in earlier decades) signified their presence.